Modeling of live biomass and net primary production of northern Eurasia forests

Volodymyr Blyshchyk of the National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine improved the models needed to estimate carbon stock in live biomass and carbon flux between the atmosphere and vegetation.

Volodymyr Blyshchyk

Volodymyr Blyshchyk

Introduction

The study of the biological productivity of forests is crucial for estimating the state and dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems under global change. Models of biological productivity represent dynamics of live biomass and net primary production (NPP) of forest ecosystems. Assessment of dynamics of biological productivity is an important part of the verified full carbon account of the forests. This research will help to reduce the uncertainties of estimation of greenhouse gas emissions in northern Eurasia, including Ukraine.

Methodology

We used methodology developed at IIASA [1]. The algorithm combines growth models, models of live biomass, and a number of parameters describing the biological production of forest ecosystem. The models have been developed in two steps:

  1. development of models for estimation of live biomass dynamics, and
  2. modeling of NPP of forest ecosystems.

Results

We analyzed and updated the existing database of live biomass in situ measurements. The database now includes over 9,000 sample plots (some located in Ukraine). It was used for parametrizing the live biomass and NPP models. The live biomass models consider seven fractions (stem wood over bark, bark, branches, foliage, roots, understory, and green forest floor) of major forest-forming species of northern Eurasia: Scots pine (by bio-climatic zones); black pine subsp. Crimean, spruce, fir, and larch; Siberian Pine oak, beech, birch, aspen, poplar, black alder, grey alder, lime, ash, hornbeam. The distribution of live biomass and sequestered carbon in forests of northern Eurasia was estimated by dominant tree species and biomass fractions. We then combined the empirical models obtained with state forest account and forest maps. This allowed us to to carry out an evaluation of the amounts of organic carbon fixed in plant tissues as well as the amounts of sequestered carbon.

Conclusions

Within this project, we improved the models needed to estimate carbon stock in live biomass and carbon flux between the atmosphere and vegetation, which is the NPP. Tables and models of biological productivity and NPP will contribute to ecologization of forest management and the creation of a solid background for sustainable forest management.

References

[1] Shvidenko A, Schepaschenko D, Nilsson S, Bouloui Y. (2007). Semi-empirical models for assessing biological productivity of Northern Eurasian forests. Ecological Modelling 204, 163-179.

Supervisors

Dmitry Shchepashchenko and Anatoly Shvidenko, Ecosystems Services and Management, IIASA

Note

Volodymyr Blyshchyk of the National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, is a citizen of Ukraine. He was funded by IIASA and worked in the Ecosystems Services and Management (ESM) Program during the YSSP.

Please note these Proceedings have received limited or no review from supervisors and IIASA program directors, and the views and results expressed therein do not necessarily represent IIASA, its National Member Organizations, or other organizations supporting the work.


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Last edited: 29 September 2015

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