31 March 2017

The Arctic Science Summit week 2017

The Arctic Science Summit Week (ASSW) is an annual meeting of national and international organizations focusing on Arctic research and exploitation, including academia, government agencies, local communities, industry, non-governmental organizations and others. This year, the conference theme was “A dynamic Arctic in Global Change” and the conference was held in Prague, Czech Republic.


©http://www.assw2017.eu

©http://www.assw2017.eu

IIASA Research Scholar from the Risk and Resilience Program and Arctic Futures Initiative Mia Landauer attended the conference and presented her work “Loss and Damage from Climate Change in the Rapidly Changing Arctic”, followed by a panel discussion in the session “Security and Governance in a Global Arctic”.

The session provided insights into the Arctic as a region, which has been a part of international political and economic systems for centuries. The session consisted of presentations on globalization, which connects the Arctic to political, economic, technological, environmental, and societal conditions and changes throughout the world.

Reflecting globalization, the session pointed out that most of the important questions for the Arctic involve actors across many different scales and are reflected in both Arctic-Global and Global-Arctic interactions.

The aim of this session was in particular to explore the impacts and consequences of greater Arctic-global interaction on the security and governance of the region, noting the significance of different goals and outcomes regarding resources, environment, and society and the interactions among them. The session included presentations on Arctic fisheries agreement for international waters of the central Arctic Ocean, which include both Arctic and non-Arctic actors, and are relevant to a discussion about resource development, environmental health and research, and the implications for society as a whole.

The session also included issues of Arctic governance in relation to security more generally, governance of high seas, extractive industries, and frameworks for environmental intelligence gathering for decision support, as well as the role of the Arctic in international debates such as in climate policy negotiations on climate related loss and damage, and international debates of global security more specifically, such as the role of Greenland in the US missile defense.

 


Print this page

Last edited: 17 May 2017

CONTACT DETAILS

Mia Landauer

IIASA Postdoctoral Research Scholar

Risk and Resilience

Capacity Building and Academic Training

T +43(0) 2236 807 587

PUBLICATIONS

Höglund Isaksson L (2017). Bottom-up simulations of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems 1980 to 2012. Environmental Research Letters 12 (2): e024007. DOI:10.1088/1748-9326/aa583e.

Nava LF (2017). Peer review report 3 on “Economic Effects of a Reservoir Re-operation Policy in the Rio Grande/Bravo for Integrated Human and Environmental Water Management”. Journal of Hydrology: Regional Studies 9: p. 152. DOI:10.1016/j.ejrh.2016.12.048.

Margalef O, Sardans J, Fernández-Martínez M, Molowny-Horas R, Janssens I A, Ciais P, Goll D, Richter A, et al. (2017). Global patterns of phosphatase activity in natural soils. Scientific Reports 7 (1): p. 1337. DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-01418-8.

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)
Schlossplatz 1, A-2361 Laxenburg, Austria
Phone: (+43 2236) 807 0 Fax:(+43 2236) 71 313